{Yom Tov Tip} Soups!

I never understood why chicken soup was a requirement on families weekly Shabbat and Yom Tov tables. I get it. It’s yum. It’s wonderful with lokshen. Or matzah balls.

But, it holds up a burner on my stovetop for 6-8 hours and can cost a small fortune. Granted, you can make lots of containers of it, and throw it in the freezer. But there are so many more recipes to try!

A few of our favorite include roast tomato, spicy zucchini, split pea, carrot ginger, potato leek and more! Here are some of the best of the web…

Sit back, simmer and enjoy!

Recipe Credit: Everyday Food
Photo Credit: Martha Stewart

 

Recipe Credit: food.com
Photo Credit: Member, Rita for food.com

 

PLEASE NOTE: This recipe contains non kosher ingredients. IN place of 2 cups of ham, we recommend some diced pastrami, or beef stew!

Recipe Credit: food.com
Photo Credit: Andy of LongMeadow Farm

 

Recipe Credit: allrecipes.com
Photo Credit: member WYSIWYG on allrecipes.com

Recipe Credit: Martha Stewart
Photo Credit: Martha Stewart

 

What’s you favorite soup? For more ideas, check out our pinterest board http://pinterest.com/thekosherhome/soup/

 

***GIVEAWAY*** Don’t forget to comment on the Apple, Honey and Pomegranate Challah recipe for a chance to win Levana’s new cookbook!

Chocolate Caramel Challah? YES, PLEASE!

I have been reading The Challah Blog for a while now, and am loving the creations that The
Hazz and The Mrs.
come up with!

Nothing blew me away more than the Chocolate Caramel Challah! Just the word caramel makes me weak at the knees.

The Mrs. makes this challah with her Basic Challah Recipe and a bunch of add ins!

This looks TO. DIE. FOR.

Chocolate Caramel Challah? YES, PLEASE!
Challah
 

Ingredients
  • ¾ c water
  • 2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 1½ tbsp honey
  • 2 eggs plus 1 more for egg wash
  • ¼ c vegetable oil
  • 3 c flour
  • 1¼ tsp salt

Instructions
  1. The Mrs. gives great directions….
  2. Place very warm (but not hot, I usually let me faucet run for a bit) water in mixing bowl. Add yeast and honey, mixing lightly.
  3. Allow to sit for 10 minutes or so… I usually do less… until you see little eruptions.
  4. Add eggs and vegetable oil and mix with wood spoon.
  5. If you have a stand mixer, add flour and salt and beat with dough hook. Remember: salt kills yeast. Don’t put the salt in with the yeast. Wait until you’ve added some of the flour.
  6. If the dough is not holding together as a ball, add a bit more oil or water. If the dough is very sticky, add more flour. The dough is ready when it sticks together as a ball and is not sticky to the touch when you poke your finger in (5-10 minutes of beating). Turn the ball out onto a floured work surface and punch a few times until very smooth.
  7. Place in oiled bowl and cover in plastic wrap or a towel.
  8. Allow to rise at least one hour, preferrably more, until dough has doubled in size. I only do one rise as a ball, but you can do more. I’m not convinced it does much to the texture but some people swear by it.
  9. Punch down the ball in the bowl and remove. Punch out all air bubbles. Braid in your preferred method. Allow to rise 20-30 minutes. Top with an egg wash (I use the yolk and white) and sesame or poppy seeds if you like.
  10. Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes. You can use a bread thermometer (180-200 degrees) or poke at the seams. If they seem doughy, give it more time. You can always add foil if the top seems like its browning too fast.
  11. I often have to foil five- and six-stranded challot because they’re so much fatter.

Photo Credit: The Challah Blog
Recipe Credit: The Challah Blog